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Rangers find elusive waterfall fish in Kakadu (2017)

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Rangers find elusive waterfall fish in Kakadu (2017)
« Gepost op: november 23, 2017, 06:45:38 pm »
 

HayoAqua

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Rangers find elusive waterfall fish in Kakadu


Braeden Lake with the waterfall rainbowfish.


Jawoyn Rangers fish research.


Waterfall rainbowfish.

A new and rare species of waterfall rainbowfish has been uncovered in remote waterfalls of Kakadu National Park.

Teams of researchers and rangers scoured the crystal clear pools carved into sandstone above remote waterfalls, while always being on high alert for a less good looking species – crocodiles.

Recording the new waterfall rainbow fish will help with conservation, education and management of the unique fish species.

The Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory has partnered with Aboriginal ranger groups across northern Australia resulting in the discovery of the new species of waterfall rainbowfish.

A lack of existing records on the waterfall rainbowfish and its fondness of only upland sandstone escarpments, made the shy species the perfect candidate for the survey.

Curator of Fishes Michael Hammer and his team were guided by the local knowledge on the remote sites from traditional owners and rangers, which proved crucial in the discovery and sampling of the rainbowfish.

Rangers struck out on foot, car or helicopter each day to sample sandstone waterfall habitats under a blazing hot sun, in some of the most remote locations in the north.

“One location took several days to get to and would not have been possible to access without the partnership with the rangers and their local knowledge and participation” Dr Hammer explained.

“Some rangers could remember places they’d been to years ago where they had previously spotted the fish, which helped immensely.”

Before surveys could take place at the site, the team did a thorough check for any signs of crocodiles before they could wade through the water with a net or set up a trap to capture the colourful fish.

“While the fish primarily occur above waterfalls, we were still constantly on high alert for crocodiles” Dr Hammer said.

The identification of new records will help develop training programs for rangers to independently conduct mapping and surveys, increase awareness of the significance of the fish and identify ways locals can help manage native and feral fish.

Sampling was done in the East Kimberley region as part of the Bush Blitz Species Discovery Program on the Karunjie and Durack stations.

Dr Hammer will present the findings of the study and the key relationships between museum researchers and Aboriginal rangers at the 2017 Territory Natural Resource Management Conference.

The Australian Government’s Australian Biological Resources Study (ABRS) National Taxonomy Research Grant Program and the Working on Country and Indigenous Protected Area programs supported the research through funding in partnership with the Jawoyn Association Aboriginal Corporation and Northern Land Council.

Bron: www.katherinetimes.com.au/story/5072977/rare-rainbowfish-found-in-kakadu
« Laatst bewerkt op: november 23, 2017, 06:49:44 pm door HayoAqua »
 

Re: Rangers find elusive waterfall fish in Kakadu (2017)
« Reactie #1 Gepost op: november 23, 2017, 06:53:42 pm »
 

HayoAqua

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Reactie van Peter Unmack op Facebook:

Citaat
The article is a bit inaccurate as it has confused Kakadu with the East Kimberley region (just a few hundred km apart). This new species which is similar to exquisita occurs in the middle of nowhere nearish to the NT/WA border.
 

Re: Rangers find elusive waterfall fish in Kakadu (2017)
« Reactie #2 Gepost op: november 24, 2017, 09:59:42 pm »
 

Royvankuik

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